Skip to main content

End of 2015 Blog Roundup

Over the past few months I've mostly been blogging at a number of other venues. These include:

  • A piece with Mark Hallerberg in Democracy Audit UK summarising our research on how, despite previous findings, democratic governments run similarly sizable bank bailout tabs as autocracies. This wasn't noticed in previous work, because democratic governments have incentives (possiblilty of losing elections) to shift the realisation of these costs into the future.

  • A post over at Bruegel introducing the Financial Supervisory Transparency Index that Mark Copelovitch, Mark Hallerberg, and I created. We also discuss supervisory transparency's implications for a European capital markets union.

  • At VoxUkraine, I discuss the causes and possible solutions to brawling in the Ukranian parliament based on my recent research in the Journal of Peace Research.

  • I didn't write this one, but my co-author Tom Pepinsky, wrote a nice piece about a new working paper we have on the (difficulty) of predicting financial crises.

Comments

Tim Nollan said…
Looking for the best writing service online but lost in the number of fake reviews and don’t know who to believe? We at ScamFighter publish only genuine reviews on all writing service from the web. Look at the last review on https://scamfighter.net/review/essaybot.com
Dakota Leest said…
Hi there. I recently used dissertation help methodology chapter. I got a good article. I'm glad I got a good grade. I like not to spend a lot of energy on homework. It gives me pleasure.
Theo Smith said…
I often read various blogs. I'm glad I found your blog. I also have information for you. I often visit this site https://essays-writers.com/. He helps me be a good student.
Allie Johnson said…
https://primedissertations.com/buy-extended-essay/ your support, a reliable companion, a chance for success. A team of specially trained professionals who are ready to keep up with you. Give a positive every day. Tried it once and stayed with us forever. Try it lucky!
===============================================================================

Try not to burn through your time in getting Dwarka accompanies

Visit: Escorts in Dwarka


Top Low-Cost Call Girls in Dwarka.

Get Services: Call Girls in Dwarka


Phenomenal Lavish escorts administration in Gurgaon on your offer

Go With: Escorts in Gurgaon


Prominent young ladies in Gurgaon let you experience exotic euphoria past your experience

Website: Call Girls in Gurgaon


Hot call young ladies for wild evenings in Gurgaon

Website: Call Girls in Gurgaon


Our Escorts: Beauties Like Models

Visit:Call Girls in Haridwar


Premium and top-class Haridwar Escorts Agency!

Go With: Call Girls in Haridwar

Popular posts from this blog

A Link Between topicmodels LDA and LDAvis

Carson Sievert and Kenny Shirley have put together the really nice LDAvis R package. It provides a Shiny-based interactive interface for exploring the output from Latent Dirichlet Allocation topic models. If you've never used it, I highly recommend checking out their XKCD example (this paper also has some nice background). LDAvis doesn't fit topic models, it just visualises the output. As such it is agnostic about what package you use to fit your LDA topic model. They have a useful example of how to use output from the lda package. I wanted to use LDAvis with output from the topicmodels package. It works really nicely with texts preprocessed using the tm package. The trick is extracting the information LDAvis requires from the model and placing it into a specifically structured JSON formatted object. To make the conversion from topicmodels output to LDAvis JSON input easier, I created a linking function called topicmodels_json_ldavis . The full function is below. To

Set up R/Stan on Amazon EC2

A few months ago I posted the script that I use to set up my R/JAGS working environment on an Amazon EC2 instance. Since then I've largely transitioned to using R/ Stan to estimate my models. So, I've updated my setup script (see below). There are a few other changes: I don't install/use RStudio on Amazon EC2. Instead, I just use R from the terminal. Don't get me wrong, I love RStudio. But since what I'm doing on EC2 is just running simulations (I handle the results on my local machine), RStudio is overkill. I don't install git anymore. Instead I use source_url (from devtools) and source_data (from repmis) to source scripts from GitHub. Again all of the manipulation I'm doing to these scripts is on my local machine.

Slide: one function for lag/lead variables in data frames, including time-series cross-sectional data

I often want to quickly create a lag or lead variable in an R data frame. Sometimes I also want to create the lag or lead variable for different groups in a data frame, for example, if I want to lag GDP for each country in a data frame. I've found the various R methods for doing this hard to remember and usually need to look at old blog posts . Any time we find ourselves using the same series of codes over and over, it's probably time to put them into a function. So, I added a new command– slide –to the DataCombine R package (v0.1.5). Building on the shift function TszKin Julian posted on his blog , slide allows you to slide a variable up by any time unit to create a lead or down to create a lag. It returns the lag/lead variable to a new column in your data frame. It works with both data that has one observed unit and with time-series cross-sectional data. Note: your data needs to be in ascending time order with equally spaced time increments. For example 1995, 1996