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Unofficial LSE LaTeX Beamer Theme

I was getting pretty tired of the usual LaTeX Beamer presentation themes (see here for examples). So I decided to create an (unofficial) LaTeX Beamer theme for the LSE.

It is based on the BerlinFU theme and Seth Brown's Bunsen theme.

It's still very much a prototype (the style files need significant cleaning up). But the theme does produce decent presentations (see here for an example). You can find the theme on GitHub here.

Please feel free to improve or fork it.

Update 11 January 2012: Here is a full example of the theme in action:

Comments

Seth Brown said…
Awesome work! I'm happy my theme[1] was of use to you. The LaTeX community needs more people generation custom themes.

[1]:http://j.mp/udsX0w
Seth Brown said…
Awesome work! I'm happy my theme[1] was of use to you. The LaTeX community needs more people generation custom themes.

[1]:http://j.mp/udsX0w
Unknown said…
Thanks for putting that blog post together. It was really helpful for creating the LSE beamer theme.

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